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iamfree-butiamflawed:

caitoooo:

imgoverdose:

Eerily realistic figures, carved from wood.

beautiful.

(via kawapunks)

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transceiverfreq:

We behold thee, and a haze, Prometheus, dims our eyes, Of awe and of many tears for thee, When we look at thee on this rock and see Thy body parched by hot rays And fettered with iron in shameful chains. But now in Olympus a new lord reigns, And Zeus kings in lawless guise, By laws that are wondrously changed of late, And those who were great In the ancient days meet a pitiful fate. -AESCHYLUS, Prometheus Bound
Saturday. June 23rd is the centennial birthday of our modern Prometheus. A single human who afforded a wealth of knowledge that has altered the way in which we in the modern world do everything.
A human persecuted, criminalized and dehumanized for the ways in which he expressed his human love. A human that in desperation took their own life committing suicide by eating an apple laced with cyanide. 
A mythology almost forms in the spaces between these bits though it is completely true.
Alan Turing was homosexual. In 1952 the British government charged him with ‘gross indecency’ and afforded him the non-choice of imprisonment or chemical castration Just under 10 years since he had cracked the ENIGMA and single-mindedly ended WWII.
He is the outcast and criminalized father of computing.
Do not forget him, what he gave us and what was taken from him.
I’ve never asked this before but, reblog.

transceiverfreq:

We behold thee, and a haze,
Prometheus, dims our eyes,
Of awe and of many tears for thee,
When we look at thee on this rock and see
Thy body parched by hot rays
And fettered with iron in shameful chains.
But now in Olympus a new lord reigns,
And Zeus kings in lawless guise,
By laws that are wondrously changed of late,
And those who were great
In the ancient days meet a pitiful fate.

-AESCHYLUS, Prometheus Bound

Saturday. June 23rd is the centennial birthday of our modern Prometheus. A single human who afforded a wealth of knowledge that has altered the way in which we in the modern world do everything.

A human persecuted, criminalized and dehumanized for the ways in which he expressed his human love. A human that in desperation took their own life committing suicide by eating an apple laced with cyanide. 

A mythology almost forms in the spaces between these bits though it is completely true.

Alan Turing was homosexual. In 1952 the British government charged him with ‘gross indecency’ and afforded him the non-choice of imprisonment or chemical castration Just under 10 years since he had cracked the ENIGMA and single-mindedly ended WWII.

He is the outcast and criminalized father of computing.

Do not forget him, what he gave us and what was taken from him.

I’ve never asked this before but, reblog.

(Source: transceiverfreq)

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ianoncedid:

Smoking is cool/terrible for your health.  On a side note, lots of cool things are happening, just can’t talk or show anything yet.  Soon!  Maybe!

ianoncedid:

Smoking is cool/terrible for your health.  On a side note, lots of cool things are happening, just can’t talk or show anything yet.  Soon!  Maybe!

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artandsciencejournal:

Mika Aoki

In her works, Mika Aoki attempts to make viewers look differently at subjects such as viruses, reproduction and the origins of life. In these works made out of glass, Aoki imitates the micro-kingdoms we glaze over every day. For more information on Aoki’s work, click here

- Lee

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metalhearts:

crochet playground by Toshiko Horiuchi Macadam

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sciencesoup:

Bioluminescent bacteria

Taking cues from the firefly, a Dutch electronics company has created a product called “Bio-light”—an eco-friendly lighting system that uses glowing, bioluminescent bacteria. They’re not powered by electricity or sunlight, but by methane generated by the company’s Microbial Home bio-digester that processes anything from vegetable scraps to human waste. The living bacteria are fed through silicon tubes, and as long as they’re nutritionally-fulfilled, they can indefinitely generate a soft, heat-free green glow using the enzyme luciferase and its substrate, luciferin. They’re kept in hand-blown glass bulbs clustered together into lamps, but you can’t light up your house with them yet—the glow isn’t nearly bright enough to replace conventional artificial lights. They do, however, get people to think about untapped household energy sources and how to make use of them. The company, Phillips, also envisions the use of these Bio-lights outside the home—for nighttime road markings, signs in theatres and clubs, and even biosensors for monitoring diabetes.

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farewell-kingdom:

 Idea Lab Installation by bluarch architecture

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therhumboogie:

By Adrián Villar Rojas, a most fascinating environmental sculpture, a to scale blue whale situated in a beautiful forest. The subtle addition of the tree stumps to make it look like it is already being assimilated by nature, brilliant touch.

(via therhumboogie)

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sfmoma:

Happy 82nd birthday to Jasper Johns!
From our website: In the 1950s Jasper Johns developed a distinctive painting style that would help lead American art away from the then-dominant movement of Abstract Expressionism. The exact correspondence of figure and ground in his work challenged the traditional distinction between an object and its depiction. At the same time, variations on each theme dissolved the “natural” link between the symbol and its meaning. Johns thus questioned the basic underpinnings of our representational system, and specifically the mechanisms of fine art.
Pictured: Jasper Johns, Flag (1960-1969) 

sfmoma:

Happy 82nd birthday to Jasper Johns!

From our websiteIn the 1950s Jasper Johns developed a distinctive painting style that would help lead American art away from the then-dominant movement of Abstract Expressionism. The exact correspondence of figure and ground in his work challenged the traditional distinction between an object and its depiction. At the same time, variations on each theme dissolved the “natural” link between the symbol and its meaning. Johns thus questioned the basic underpinnings of our representational system, and specifically the mechanisms of fine art.

Pictured: Jasper Johns, Flag (1960-1969) 

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tchmo:

tchmo, Untitled (Abstract) 20120502m

tchmo:

tchmo, Untitled (Abstract) 20120502m