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artandsciencejournal:

Mika Aoki

In her works, Mika Aoki attempts to make viewers look differently at subjects such as viruses, reproduction and the origins of life. In these works made out of glass, Aoki imitates the micro-kingdoms we glaze over every day. For more information on Aoki’s work, click here

- Lee

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metalhearts:

crochet playground by Toshiko Horiuchi Macadam

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sciencesoup:

Bioluminescent bacteria

Taking cues from the firefly, a Dutch electronics company has created a product called “Bio-light”—an eco-friendly lighting system that uses glowing, bioluminescent bacteria. They’re not powered by electricity or sunlight, but by methane generated by the company’s Microbial Home bio-digester that processes anything from vegetable scraps to human waste. The living bacteria are fed through silicon tubes, and as long as they’re nutritionally-fulfilled, they can indefinitely generate a soft, heat-free green glow using the enzyme luciferase and its substrate, luciferin. They’re kept in hand-blown glass bulbs clustered together into lamps, but you can’t light up your house with them yet—the glow isn’t nearly bright enough to replace conventional artificial lights. They do, however, get people to think about untapped household energy sources and how to make use of them. The company, Phillips, also envisions the use of these Bio-lights outside the home—for nighttime road markings, signs in theatres and clubs, and even biosensors for monitoring diabetes.

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aminuteofperfection:

Bromma Airport Hotel
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gopetdesign:

Brooklyn Bulldog ! #bulldog #brookyn #williamsburg #newyork #gopetdesign (Taken with instagram)

gopetdesign:

Brooklyn Bulldog ! #bulldog #brookyn #williamsburg #newyork #gopetdesign (Taken with instagram)

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voiceofnature:

For over 13 years (and girlfriend and children), architect Mickey Muennig lived in the tiny Greenhouse—his 1976 take on the then-popular dome and his celestial artistic response. From the deck of the outdoor bath, you can see up the coast.

Inside the one-room house, the reclaimed-redwood platform bed hangs on slender steel rods fastened to the ceiling. The ceiling cap is a vent—the house’s thermostat.

(via mandysaurus)

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ikenbot:

Planet X? New Evidence of an Unseen Planet at Solar System’s Edge
Image: This artist’s conception illustrates a giant planet floating freely without a parent star. Astronomers recently uncovered evidence for such lone worlds, thought to have been booted from developing star systems. The sun may have captured such a planet, which new work shows may reside at the edge of the solar system. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Warning: Approach Article With Skepticism
A planet four times the size of Earth may be skirting the edges of the solar system beyond Pluto, according to new research. Too distant to be easily spotted by Earth-based telescopes, the unseen planet could be gravitationally tugging on small icy objects past Neptune, helping explain the mystery of those objects’ peculiar orbits.
The claim comes from Rodney Gomes, a noted astronomer at the National Observatory of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro. Gomes presented his recently completed computer models suggesting the existence of the distant planet at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Timberline Lodge, Ore., earlier this month.
Astronomers who attended the talk find Gomes’ arguments compelling, but they say much more evidence is needed before the hypothetical planet can be crowned as real.
For several years, astronomers have observed that a handful of the small icy bodies that lie in the so-called “scattered disc” beyond the orbit of the planet Neptune, including the dwarf planet Sedna, deviate from the paths around the sun that would be expected based on the gravitational pulls of all the known objects in the solar system.
Sedna, for example, swings around the sun in an extremely elongated orbit — tracing out a very long oval. “Sedna’s orbit is truly peculiar,” said Mike Brown, an astronomer at Caltech who led the team that discovered Sedna in 2003.
However, when Gomes ran the same calculations with the addition of the gravitational pull of a massive planet at the outskirts of the solar system, Sedna and the other anomalous objects’ expected orbits fell in line with observations. The unseen planet would be too far away to perceptibly perturb the motions of Earth and the other inner planets, but close enough to the scattered disc objects to sway them.
Full Article
Similar Stories: [The True Stories of 5 Mystery Planets]

ikenbot:

Planet X? New Evidence of an Unseen Planet at Solar System’s Edge

Image: This artist’s conception illustrates a giant planet floating freely without a parent star. Astronomers recently uncovered evidence for such lone worlds, thought to have been booted from developing star systems. The sun may have captured such a planet, which new work shows may reside at the edge of the solar system. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Warning: Approach Article With Skepticism

A planet four times the size of Earth may be skirting the edges of the solar system beyond Pluto, according to new research. Too distant to be easily spotted by Earth-based telescopes, the unseen planet could be gravitationally tugging on small icy objects past Neptune, helping explain the mystery of those objects’ peculiar orbits.

The claim comes from Rodney Gomes, a noted astronomer at the National Observatory of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro. Gomes presented his recently completed computer models suggesting the existence of the distant planet at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Timberline Lodge, Ore., earlier this month.

Astronomers who attended the talk find Gomes’ arguments compelling, but they say much more evidence is needed before the hypothetical planet can be crowned as real.

For several years, astronomers have observed that a handful of the small icy bodies that lie in the so-called “scattered disc” beyond the orbit of the planet Neptune, including the dwarf planet Sedna, deviate from the paths around the sun that would be expected based on the gravitational pulls of all the known objects in the solar system.

Sedna, for example, swings around the sun in an extremely elongated orbit — tracing out a very long oval. “Sedna’s orbit is truly peculiar,” said Mike Brown, an astronomer at Caltech who led the team that discovered Sedna in 2003.

However, when Gomes ran the same calculations with the addition of the gravitational pull of a massive planet at the outskirts of the solar system, Sedna and the other anomalous objects’ expected orbits fell in line with observations. The unseen planet would be too far away to perceptibly perturb the motions of Earth and the other inner planets, but close enough to the scattered disc objects to sway them.

Full Article

Similar Stories: [The True Stories of 5 Mystery Planets]

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

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polychroniadis:

‘Powers of Ten’ by Sarah Sze, 2001.
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farewell-kingdom:

 Idea Lab Installation by bluarch architecture

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therhumboogie:

By Adrián Villar Rojas, a most fascinating environmental sculpture, a to scale blue whale situated in a beautiful forest. The subtle addition of the tree stumps to make it look like it is already being assimilated by nature, brilliant touch.

(via therhumboogie)